Categories
Edited Book Chapters

“Attack of the Livid Dead: Recalibrating Terror in the Post-9/11 Zombie Film”

Citation:

Muntean, Nick & Payne, Matthew Thomas. “Attack of the Livid Dead: Recalibrating Terror in the Post-9/11 Zombie Film.” The War on Terror and American Popular Culture: September 11 and Beyond. Edited by Andrew Schopp and Matthew B. Hill. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2009: 239-258.

From the anthology’s Introduction:

“Nicholas Muntean and Matthew Thomas Payne’s ‘Attack of the Livid Dead: Recalibrating Terror in the Post-9/11 Zombie Film’ interrogates post-September 11 zombie films, and the significant changes in this genre’s formula, as they reflect a cultural tension between affirming traditional American ideals and challenging our contemporary social and political practice … Their study emphasizes that while [28 Days Later and Dawn of the Dead] diverge from predecessors in common ways, especially by depicting the zombie as a ravenous, swift threat that cares for nothing but itself and attacks rabidly and indiscriminately (i.e., terrorism) rather than the slow, almost moronic figures of tradition (i.e., the Cold War), they diverge from each other in terms of what they reflect about post-September 11 culture and how to function within that culture.” (pp. 34-35)

Categories
Edited Book Chapters

“Manufacturing Militainment: Video Game Producers and Military Brand Games”

Citation:

Payne, Matthew Thomas. “Manufacturing Militainment: Video Game Producers and Military Brand Games.” War Isn’t Hell, It’s Entertainment: Essays on Visual Media and Representation of Conflict. Edited by Rikke Schubart, Fabian Virchow, Debra White-Stanley & Tanja Thomas. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2009: 238-255.

From the anthology’s Introduction:

“We should ask ourselves what the military is thinking when producing video games as instruments of public relations, recruitment, and training. This is exactly what Matthew Thomas Payne does in his essay based on interviews with the head producers of America’s Army (2002), America’s Army: Rise of a Soldier (2005), and Full Spectrum Warrior (2004). These producers become new media cultural brokers whose visions of war and opinions about representation and realism are immensely important in shaping the games that entertain millions of users globally.” (p. 8)

Categories
Edited Book Chapters

“Playing the Deja-New: Plug it in and Play TV Games and the Cultural Politics of Classic Gaming”

Citation:

Payne, Matthew T. “Playing the Deja-New: Plug it in and Play TV Games and the Cultural Politics of Classic Gaming.” Playing the Past: History and Nostalgia in Video Games. Edited by Zach Whalen and Laurie N. Taylor. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, 2008: 51-68.

From the anthology’s Introduction:

“‘Playing the Deja-New: Plug it in and Play TV Games and the Cultural Politics of Classic Gaming’ discusses the marketing logic and intellectual property issues surrounding the popular dedicated controller devices. Comparing the games licensed for these plug-and-play units with the open source MAME (Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator), Payne argues that these commercially licensed properties create a revisionary almost mythological narrative of gaming history that downplays the gritty reality that MAME and home-brew community celebrate.”  (pp. 7-8)

Categories
Other essays

“Video Game Wii-ealism”

Citation:

Payne, Matthew T. “Video Game Wii-ealism.” In Media Res: a Media Commons Project. 19 July 2007.

Categories
Articles (refereed)

“The Digital Divide and its Discontents”

Citation:

Payne, Matthew T. “The Digital Divide and its Discontents.” Currents in Electronic Literacy 9 (Fall 2005).

 

Abstract:

From the conclusion: “Video games have rarely, if ever, been framed as being of possible benefit to the ICT usage and skills divide. Yet, the three selected video game-related projects demonstrate a myriad of literacies that video games could be constituted to support. Moreover, these groups are all working towards ameliorating various ICT divides. The Education Arcade is addressing the gulf between popular and educational game titles. Flanagan’s RAPUNSEL project works to familiarize young girls with a programming language, thereby addressing the gender gap in the IT work force. And, the work of the Room 130 group addresses the gaping hole in video game scholarship. Seen this way, video games not only have something to say about learning a new language, they also have the potential to bridge existing techno-social inequities, and those still to come.”