Categories
Edited Book Chapters

“Militarism and Online Games”

Citation:

Huntemann, Nina B. and Matthew Thomas Payne. “Militarism and Online Games.” International Encyclopedia of Digital Communication and Society Volume 3. Eds. James Ivory and Aphra Kerr. Blackwell-Wiley,  2015.

Abstract:

This essay describes the interlinking histories of video games and militarism. It contends that the history of video games is incomplete without an accounting of the role that defense interests play in the technological development and popularization of military-themed games. The piece introduces key concepts and titles worthy of scholarly attention.

Categories
Edited Book Chapters

“Connected Viewing, Connected Capital: Fostering Gameplay Across Screens”

Citation:
Payne, Matthew Thomas. “Connected Viewing, Connected Capital: Fostering Gameplay Across Screens.” Connected Viewing: Selling, Sharing, and Streaming Media in a Digital Era. Edited by Jennifer Holt and Kevin Sanson (New York: Routledge, 2014): 183-201.

From the anthology’s Introduction:
“Matthew Thomas Payne considers how gamers participate in transmedia play as a way to connect with fellow players, and how these extended forms of immersion add interest in franchises and build users’ gaming capital.” (p. 10)

Categories
Edited Book Chapters

“Everything I Need to Know About Filmmaking I Learned from Playing Video Games: The Educational Promise of Machinima”

Citation:

Payne, Matthew Thomas. “Everything I Need to Know About Filmmaking I Learned from Playing Video Games: The Educational Promise of Machinima.” The Machinima Reader. Edited by Henry Lowood and Michael Nitsche. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2011: 241-256.

From the anthology’s Introduction:

“Matthew Thomas Payne describes the pedagogical value of machinima, using The Sims as a case study for the development of media literacy through machinima.” (p. x)

Categories
Edited Book Chapters

“F*ck You, Noob Tube!: Learning the Art of Ludic LAN War”

Citation:
Payne, Matthew Thomas. “F*ck You, Noob Tube!: Learning the Art of Ludic LAN War.” Joystick Soldiers: The Politics of Play in Military Video Games. Edited by Nina B. Huntemann and Matthew T. Payne (New York: Routledge, 2009): 206-222.

From the anthology’s Introduction:
“In the second chapter on players, Matthew Payne reports on his participant observations of a gaming center to explore the social codes and conventions present in a commercial play space. Payne’s ethnography finds that the dynamic gaming environment is shaped as much by the war-oriented texts as it is by the devoted players who frequent the gaming center.The “ludic war” experience that Payne details highlights how militarism and gaming technologies influence play behavior that dominates a semi-public, shared play space.” (p. 15)

Categories
Edited Book Chapters

“Interpreting Gameplay through Existential Ludology”

Citation:
Payne, Matthew Thomas. “Interpreting Gameplay through Existential Ludology.” Handbook of Research on Effective Electronic Gaming in Education. Edited by Richard E. Ferdig (Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference, 2009): 621-635.

Abstract:
This chapter introduces and operationalizes an innovative interpretive strategy called “existential ludology” to explain how the game-play mechanics of two tactical shooter video gamesAmerica’s Army: Rise of a Soldier (Microsoft’s Xbox) and Full Spectrum Warrior (Sony’s PlayStation 2)educate gamers on how to play militarily. These titles, both produced in part by the U.S. Department of Defense, engender strict, doctrinal learning opportunities by embedding official combat protocols into their game-play structures. By employing existential ludology as an interpretive tool we can understand these military-backed games from an experiential, player-centric perspective, while also recognizing how their seemingly innocuous game-play is located within, and linked to, larger networks of power. Moreover, existential ludology’s flexibility as an interpretive instrument encourages educators to recognize the educational affordances of popular video games so that they might adopt these popular media artifacts for their own pedagogical ends.

Categories
Edited Book Chapters

“Attack of the Livid Dead: Recalibrating Terror in the Post-9/11 Zombie Film”

Citation:

Muntean, Nick & Payne, Matthew Thomas. “Attack of the Livid Dead: Recalibrating Terror in the Post-9/11 Zombie Film.” The War on Terror and American Popular Culture: September 11 and Beyond. Edited by Andrew Schopp and Matthew B. Hill. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2009: 239-258.

From the anthology’s Introduction:

“Nicholas Muntean and Matthew Thomas Payne’s ‘Attack of the Livid Dead: Recalibrating Terror in the Post-9/11 Zombie Film’ interrogates post-September 11 zombie films, and the significant changes in this genre’s formula, as they reflect a cultural tension between affirming traditional American ideals and challenging our contemporary social and political practice … Their study emphasizes that while [28 Days Later and Dawn of the Dead] diverge from predecessors in common ways, especially by depicting the zombie as a ravenous, swift threat that cares for nothing but itself and attacks rabidly and indiscriminately (i.e., terrorism) rather than the slow, almost moronic figures of tradition (i.e., the Cold War), they diverge from each other in terms of what they reflect about post-September 11 culture and how to function within that culture.” (pp. 34-35)

Categories
Edited Book Chapters

“Manufacturing Militainment: Video Game Producers and Military Brand Games”

Citation:

Payne, Matthew Thomas. “Manufacturing Militainment: Video Game Producers and Military Brand Games.” War Isn’t Hell, It’s Entertainment: Essays on Visual Media and Representation of Conflict. Edited by Rikke Schubart, Fabian Virchow, Debra White-Stanley & Tanja Thomas. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2009: 238-255.

From the anthology’s Introduction:

“We should ask ourselves what the military is thinking when producing video games as instruments of public relations, recruitment, and training. This is exactly what Matthew Thomas Payne does in his essay based on interviews with the head producers of America’s Army (2002), America’s Army: Rise of a Soldier (2005), and Full Spectrum Warrior (2004). These producers become new media cultural brokers whose visions of war and opinions about representation and realism are immensely important in shaping the games that entertain millions of users globally.” (p. 8)

Categories
Edited Book Chapters

“Playing the Deja-New: Plug it in and Play TV Games and the Cultural Politics of Classic Gaming”

Citation:

Payne, Matthew T. “Playing the Deja-New: Plug it in and Play TV Games and the Cultural Politics of Classic Gaming.” Playing the Past: History and Nostalgia in Video Games. Edited by Zach Whalen and Laurie N. Taylor. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, 2008: 51-68.

From the anthology’s Introduction:

“‘Playing the Deja-New: Plug it in and Play TV Games and the Cultural Politics of Classic Gaming’ discusses the marketing logic and intellectual property issues surrounding the popular dedicated controller devices. Comparing the games licensed for these plug-and-play units with the open source MAME (Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator), Payne argues that these commercially licensed properties create a revisionary almost mythological narrative of gaming history that downplays the gritty reality that MAME and home-brew community celebrate.”  (pp. 7-8)